I can very much relate. During my adolescent years, I grew up in Birkenhead, near Liverpool (UK). At that time, Birkenhead was a virtually all-white town; many of my experiences were akin to something out of a Richard Wright novel. For example, I can remember constantly being told to smile by white adults. Once, when I was walking down a street, a carload of men stopped and shouted at me, “smile!”

Although I was born in the UK, I spent my early years (ages 1-5) in another majority white area - closer to your neck of the woods - in Amherst, Massachusetts. When my grandmother (white) was visiting us from the UK, my mother recalls her reporting that some white drivers were honking at her in disapproval, when she took my younger sister out in a stroller.

I don’t think that minority status is good for the mind, body or spirit. For this reason, as an adult, my goal has been to actively seek out environments with healthier (more Black) demographics.

Unlisted

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WRITER. SCHOLAR. RESEARCHER. Interests: Racial Equity, Racial Justice, Colorblind Racism. Co-Editor: Social Determinants of Health among African-American Men.

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Clare Xanthos, PhD

Clare Xanthos, PhD

WRITER. SCHOLAR. RESEARCHER. Interests: Racial Equity, Racial Justice, Colorblind Racism. Co-Editor: Social Determinants of Health among African-American Men.